Theory and practice of counseling and psychotherapy chapter 1

Deborah C. Escalante

Presentation on theme: “Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy Chapter 11″— Presentation transcript:

1 Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy Chapter 11
by Gerald Corey Brooks/Cole, A division of Cengage Learning Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy Chapter 11

2 Reality Therapy Basic Beliefs
Symptoms are the result of choices we’ve made in our lives We can chose to think, feel and behave differently Emphasis is on personal responsibility Therapist’s function is to keep therapy focused on the present We often mistakenly choose misery in our best attempt to meet our needs We act responsibly when we meet our needs without keeping others from meeting their needs Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy – Chapter 11 (1) Reality Therapy Basic Beliefs

3 Basic Needs All internally motivated behavior is geared toward meeting one or more of our basic human needs Belonging Power Freedom Fun Survival (Physiological needs) Our brain functions as a control system to get us what we want Our quality world consists of our visions of specific people, activities, events, beliefs and situations that will fulfill our needs Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy – Chapter 11 (2) Basic Needs All internally motivated behavior is geared toward meeting one or more of our basic human needs.

4 Procedures That Lead to Change: The “WDEP” System
W Wants – What do you want to be and do? Your “picture album” D Doing and Direction – What are you doing? Where do you want to go? E Evaluation – Does your present behavior have a reasonable chance of getting you what you want? P Planning – “SAMIC3” Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy – Chapter 11 (3) Procedures That Lead to Change: The WDEP System

5 Planning For Change – Can you do this on a continuous basis?
S Simple – Easy to understand, specific and concrete A Attainable – Within the capacities and motivation of the client M Measurable – Are the changes observable and helpful? I Immediate and Involved – What can be done today? What can you do? C Controlled – Can you do this by yourself or will you be dependent on others? – Can you do this on a continuous basis? Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy – Chapter 11 (4) Planning For Change - Can you do this on a continuous basis

BACA JUGA:   Psychiatrist or psychologist for borderline personality disorder

6 Total Behavior Our Best Attempt to Satisfy Our Needs
DOING – active behaviors THINKING – thoughts, self-statements FEELINGS – anger, joy, pain, anxiety PHYSIOLOGY – bodily reactions Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy – Chapter 11 (5) Total Behavior Our Best Attempt to Satisfy Our Needs

7 Application of Reality Therapy to Group Counseling
Group leaders and members jointly determine goals and plans of action In group, members explore new courses of behavior that will bring them closer to getting what they want out of life Leaders challenge group members to evaluate for themselves if what they are currently doing is working for them Feedback from leaders and group members can help individuals design realistic and attainable plans Group setting encourages members to take an active stance in attaining change in their lives Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy – Chapter 11 (6) Application of Reality Therapy to Group Counseling

8 Limitations of Reality Therapy
Some feel it does not adequately address important psychological concepts such as insight, the unconscious, dreams and transference Clinicians may have trouble viewing all psychological disorders (including serious mental illness) as behavioral choices There is a danger for the therapist of imposing his or her personal views on clients by deciding for the client what constitutes responsible behavior Reality therapy is often construed as simple and easy to master when in fact it requires much training to implement properly. More empirical support is needed Theory and Practice of Counseling and Psychotherapy – Chapter 11 (7) Limitations of Reality Therapy

This comprehensive, topically arranged text provides a contemporary account of counseling theories as practiced by internationally acclaimed experts in the field. Each chapter covers the way mindfulness, strengths-based positive psychology, and the common factors model is integrated into the theory. A special emphasis on evidence-based practice helps readers prepare for their work in the field. Key Features  • The text focuses on how each theory presents a useful and effective basis for contemporary practice, providing students with the most up-to-date scholarship on current theories and how these theories guide the practice of today’s counselors and psychotherapists.  • Chapters are written by internationally acclaimed experts offering a truly global and complete perspective of the field.  • Discussion of the pros and cons of each theoretical approach allows students to explore all sides of an approach, offering an opportunity for balanced, critical analysis of the material.  • Brief therapies or “manualized” approaches, developed in response to the limits imposed by insurance companies on the number of reimbursable therapy sessions per client, are addressed, as many theoretical approaches offer strategies for providing these therapies.  • Careful discussion in every chapter of the applicability of theories to a diverse client population allows readers to address the specific needs of a broader clientele while acknowledging gender, race, age, sexual orientation, religion, etc.  • Integrated coverage of and a separate chapter on evidence-based practice introduce students to what is becoming the expected standard for effectively working with clients.  • Lists of additional resources from expert contributors allow students to further explore the concepts presented.

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